AN OMEN

Jungle Jim

Well Known Member
Anyone been seeing any really big grasshoppers lately? Like three or four inch winged long distance flyers? In PP, PHX or even TUC?

I've had one or two a day swamped in my pool and saw quite a few on the way to PP and out in the desert there. Saw several on a drive to and from Blythe.

Let me know as this could be the something really big as in the tip of the iceburg.

JJ
 

CheddarBob

Well Known Member
Anyone been seeing any really big grasshoppers lately? Like three or four inch winged long distance flyers? In PP, PHX or even TUC?

I've had one or two a day swamped in my pool and saw quite a few on the way to PP and out in the desert there. Saw several on a drive to and from Blythe.

Let me know as this could be the something really big as in the tip of the iceburg.

JJ
Locusts?
 

Jungle Jim

Well Known Member
Insects, especially the ground dwellers are the common secondary host for many parasites to include ticks, tapeworms, roundworms, etc.

The infected insects are designed by evolution to be eaten then digested where the parasite will be released into the gut of the new host and then work its way to their final happy home in the muscles, heart, lungs and brains or even eyeballs.

Therefore I wouldn't even consider eating an insect raw, cooked or otherwise.

The Black Agave Skipper butterfly caterpillar in bottles of Mezcal and Tequila might be sterile but I just don't think they justify some dork swallowing one down to prove his macho power.

JJ
 
Last edited:

AZRob

Well Known Member
I say each his own.
If you get something from eating a bug, more beach space for other to enjoy.
 

Jungle Jim

Well Known Member
Most land dwelling vertebrates succumb early due to their death load of parasites long before their bodies would actually wear out from old age. This includes humans in many parts of the turd world. That includes the hoards of primitivos now inundating our southern border.......soon to infect your neighborhood everywhere in the Former USA as in FUSA.

JJ
 

Old55

Well Known Member
McDonalds kills 100’s of thousands through heart disease and global warming intensifying cattle grazing for 1/4 pounders…..anyone that eats oysters and shrimp and says no to bugs lacks a bit of self knowledge.
 

Southbeacher

Well Known Member
Chitin, the substance in the cricket (and grasshopper) shell that some people (those with shellfish and mushroom allergies) are allergic to, can create side effects like constipation, nausea and upset stomach. It also prevents absorption of vitamins A, D, E and K as well as calcium and magnesium. Sounds like a super food to me . . . .
 

corndog

Junior Member
No big grasshoppers, but I did come across a couple asshoppers a few years ago... one approximatley 65 inches in length and the other maybe 72 inches... they were at km 58 on the highwy to El Golfo, back where the big stand of salt cedar and the old train station are .. we got back in the buggy and took off..
 
Last edited:

AZRob

Well Known Member
No big grasshoppers, but I did come across a couple asshoppers a few years ago... one approximatley 65 inches in length and the other maybe 72 inches... they were at km 58 on the highwy to El Golfo, back where the big stand of salt cedar and the old train station are .. we got back in the buggy and took off..
Wow a 5'6'' and a 6' asshoppers.
 

Jungle Jim

Well Known Member
That area around the Salt Station used to be a popular spot for modern day bandits. The usual rouse was being out of gas, needing a simple tool or stuck in the sand.

I've had three attempts made on me and my rigs over the years until the Coastal Highway was completed.

Not sure how many people fell for them as no one would ever hear from them again.

JJ
 

corndog

Junior Member
Before the highway was built, that was our first stop on runs from RP to El Golfo, to rest before the long run through the (for lack of a better description) salt flats that start across the road. The salt they pulled out of that area, I was told alot of it went to Italy to be used somehow in the manufacture of ceramic tile. ... We used to come across small boulder size chunks of it, that smelled like rotten fish. Then after the salt flats, a beautiful beach and from there climb a steep hill and drive the top of the mud cliffs to the fish camp, where the old man in charge always made my wife and I something to eat. (Back to subject) The hijackers could probably sit there all day there.. plenty of shade, there was a big water tank and possibly a hand dug well.. Back then it was out in the middle of nowhere and if somebody wanted a free 4x4, buggy or quad.. that would be the place to do it..
 
Last edited:

GringoZona

Well Known Member
That's so sad. I wanted to take my jeep down there.

I was inspired by a book by a guy from Britain in the 90s who wrote a book about going up and down the Baja coast on the opposite side. He hiked it and met tons of friendly faces along the way. *does anyone know that book? He wrote a second, involving a horse*

Also was obsessed with books I would find, both new (at the flag shop in Tucson on 1st & Ft Lowell) and old books I would find at Bookmans about Ejidos along each coast.

It made me explore ways to condense my music into these crazy mp3 players. My 1st one had a hard drive that you could take with you in yor hand and cost like $1200.
 

corndog

Junior Member
We started with grasshoppers, then asshoppers... We have been all over Mexico's west side. one of the best drive's was to Presa Novillo and the La Ruta del Rio Sonora... 2006 we started at the small hotel Las Buganvillas in Hermosillo, from there drove to the dam at Novillo. It had rained and the desert wild flower's were spectacular. Arriving at the dam, I encountered the scariest boat ramp in the world, dropped the bass boat in the water. found a guide and took off to fish and see what we could of the submerged church Batuc, we caught a couple bass and the guide turned them into ceviche, we ate it, beacause we were hungry, it was delicious. Then I wanted to take the boat to San Pedro de las Cuevas. Glen Bell who was the founder of Taco Bell had built a Bed and Breakfast, called Panchitas Bed and Breakfast, with a small private landing strip for his bass fishing buddies.. anyway the rivers wern't running, (Rio Sonora and Rio Yaqui) so not deep enough to navigate.. we fished then headed back to the dam, loaded the boat and the guide had come across a desert tortoise and mentioned he was going have it cooked in red chile, I almost threw up and convinced him to turn it loose. Then headed for the Ruta Rio Sonora, very nice drive.. Every town along the way had something unique about it.. churches, plazas,, The town of Aconchi, was full of wooden furniture builders and the statue of Jesus in the church was black.. This building was mostly underwater when we were there..
San Pedro
This past winter we headed to Baja, on th old road from El Golfo to San Luis we take a cut off at Luis B Sanchez to highway four .. there was a lady outside of Luis B Sanchez that was selling Callo de Lobina in english it transltes to bass scallops.. after eating ceviche de lobina i had to have some.. It also was delicious.. I spotted a lady on Josefa a few months ago also selling Callo de Lobina but didn't try it.
 
Last edited:

corndog

Junior Member
Old55 Sad Sad story, the picture in your article shows the beauty of the area..this is where they all hang out on Sunday's.. I dont think it was affected since its a hot spring that comes out of the side of a montain, just outside of Aconchi. Water comes out at 100 degrees celsius..
 
Top