Let's talk clams

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nojopo

Guest
I love the local clams and will be down in a couple of weeks to whip up a couple good meals with the local clams. Two questions - 1. Does anyone ever collect the clams on Encanto and eat them (several varieties) and any idea where the clams on the malecon come from and are they good?
 

joester

2 salty dawgs
we've bought clams at Thanksgiving time 2008 and 2009 - 50 cents/lb for the litle ones- on the Malecon.
very tasty after rising them out well. no idea where they come from.
 
most of the clams you buy in the fishmarket are from La Pinta estuary... you can find the same type in Cholla Bay... and FYI they are not clams... they are from the cockel family and their scientific name is "California White Venus Cockel"
 

rockyptjoe

Well Known Member
most of the clams you buy in the fishmarket are from La Pinta estuary... you can find the same type in Cholla Bay... and FYI they are not clams... they are from the cockel family and their scientific name is "California White Venus Cockel"
Picky....picky....picky.....

A clam is a clam is a clam.......:rofl:
 

rockyptjoe

Well Known Member
yes but a Cockle is a Cockle

(I even spelled it correctly this time)
Yes you did....but it's still a clam!!! And I didn't get the following from wikipedia....:stir::rofl:


also called heart clam
any of the approximately 250 species of marine bivalve mollusks, or clams, of the family Cardiidae. Distributed worldwide, they range from about one centimetre (0.4 inch) in diameter to about 15 centimetres (about 6 inches)—the size of the smooth giant cockle (Laevicardium elatum) of California.

The two valves of the shell are equal in size and shape, and range in colour from brown to red or yellow. Those of many species are quite smooth; others have ribs radiating from the hinge area between the shells.
Most species live just below the low-tide line; some have been obtained from depths ...


Boy, I must be bored....eh????????????
 
S

Submarine

Guest
I like my clams spread eagle, but you can keep the cock-le.
 

SunDevil

Well Known Member
what about collecting clams/cockles yourself? I have heard you can do it out at Cholla Bay. I am also guessing you can do it out by the estuary. are there places you can get to in a 2wd or do you need 4wd or a boat?
 

Wood Spinner

Well Known Member
Hey Mark didn't do any advertising but his wife takes people out to Cholla and does clam getting. Don't know how much she charges but I do know you will get a bunch of clams. Mark also has a great Chowder receipe. If you go with her you will not get stuck in the mud. She has the buckets and rakes.
 

Kenny

Well Known Member
Forum Supporter
You walk out, chase the tide if you will. You will not be welcome if you drive out to where the clam bed's are in Cholla bay. It's very simple really, all you need is a rake, but I've done well enough by hand. When you get almost into Cholla, the first local house's on the right, you will probably see some cars and people out to the right where high tide line is, and some will have followed the path out onto the floor of the bay.. You might have to cut across a few times, but you will come to a fence that go's toward the water, follow it. If you just watch what the locals, or others who seem to know what their doing, ask, or just follow what they are doing, and you should do fine.

Kenny
 
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Thanks for the plug Bill... here's what to look for if you want to find clams\cockles...

[video=youtube;K7WOMgbvaT0]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K7WOMgbvaT0[/video]
 
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B

bahiatrader

Guest
I've never done it myself, but I've watched people at Cholla Bay slog around on the silty flats when the tide is out, gathering cockle/clams. I'm sure someone who lives there would be happy to give you information. You don't need any specialized equipment except maybe some galoshes, a stick/trowel/large spoon, and a bucket or bag to put them in. My wife and I dug some using our hands at Kino Bay one time. We had fresh clams, taters and eggs for breakfast that morning. ¡Muy sabroso!
 

SunDevil

Well Known Member
alright - despite the consultes warning - the family is heading down this weekend. hoping to take the 4 year old out clamming. looks like there will be a negative tide on both Sat and Sun morning. is the clamming area out by Cholla Bay nice and sandy or is it pretty muckey? do we need anything other than a bucket and a rake? we will let you know how we do. thanks. ASU
 

azdiva

Well Known Member
I have also gone clamming off of sandy beach near the Reef bar. Low tide in knee deep water, bend over and feel for them in the sand, pull
em out and put them in a bucket or burlap bag. You get about a dozen in 15 minutes. They are delicious. You don't need a clamming rake
or shovel, just your hands.
 

rockyptjoe

Well Known Member
this is one of the many highlights of this area, Cholla bay is prime because of the large flats. All you need is a bag, because you will have too many to put in a pocket.

A bucket and small rake is handy to dig them out. "Galoshes?" No way, your toes are the tool used for ones with out the fancy rake. You will find clams and cockles. The oysters are deep creatures, out of La Pinta locals use "long line tube scuba" and bring them back by the boat loads. A clam is different than a cockle, I think Sea Dwellers vid showed cockles, great for chowder, clams great just with butter and garlic. Or clams in coconut rice, excellent stuff.
Just watch out for stingrays if you're walking around in the soft sand in shallow water....do the "stingray shuffle"....
 

Cabo

Spanish Mackerrel
No Wahoo, those are definitely clams. My favorite pastime at Cholla.

Clams have circular Ridges, Cockles have ridges going out. Pointy ridges at the edges like teeth.

When clamming go on a declining tide, that way they have not had a chance to hide.
Also the "evil nails", Stingrays come to the shore on rising tides, on declining tides the go to the deep.
They are smart that way, they know the danger of being stranded on declining tides.

The tide drops so fast you can see it go and the same when it is rising, that is a sight in itself.


(I let them soak in a bucket with 1/2 cup of corn starch, that way they cleanse themselves from the Grit.)
 

Roberto

Well Known Member
If you don't mind a short drive, go out to La Pinta, a couple of miles past the Mayan Palace. If you have 2WD, drive down to Gillespie's old Hacienda and park there. There will be a lot of Pangas on the beach and in the water. Go down the beach, to the left, a couple of hundred yards or so. There is a very large white concrete square thing all the way back on the edge of the dunes that seems to mark the spot pretty well. There is a huge clam bed there and you can gather all you want in a very short time. Arrive at max low tide, the clams will be on the beach not under water. When conditions are right the clams are squirting up in the air a foot or so, just scrape away the sand the pick them up.
The beach is sandy with lots of shells. Your 4 year old will love it. There are not a lot of people around and the beach is spectacular. I've clammed at Choya but the proximity of all the houses and septic tanks bothers me out there.

If you go down teh beach in the other direction, into the estuary you will come to a large rock fall that is what I believe to be the remains of Gillespie's old gold stamping mill. Lots of legend in that area.
 
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