Mayan guards kicked us out of the estuary while we were fishing today.

richwi

Active Member
We have recently seen both boats and jet skis in the Estera Marua estuary. Motorized boats are illegal. Maybe they were reacting to this?
 

audsley

Well Known Member
Dirtsurfer, was this at La Pinta estuary? Were you just at the end of the road where they launch the boats, or had you walked closer to the Mayan? Or did you cross the estuary to the mouth?
 

mondone

Whitecaps
Forum Supporter
Not cool and ILLEGAL! :

AMLO signs off on new law allowing free access to all beaches

Prohibiting access could result in a fine of up to 1 million pesos

Published on Wednesday, October 21, 2020

President López Obrador has signed into law a guarantee of free access and transit on beaches throughout Mexico and establishes sanctions for those who prohibit access with fines of up to 1 million pesos (US $49,400).
The move comes after the Congress approved a reform to the General Law on National Assets in late September that established fines for owners of coastal properties who prevent, restrict, obstruct or place conditions on access to beaches. By law all beaches in Mexico are public.
Fines can be issued if fences, barriers or buildings prevent entry to a beach or if property owners, hotel security staff or other hotel personnel block access when there is not an alternative public path.

Concession or permit holders could see their permissions to operate revoked if they are found in violation of the new law.
“Mexican beaches are constitutionally and legally public, so there must be access roads so that any national or foreign visitor who wishes to enjoy them can do so. However, despite this legal status, there are still multiple complaints from citizens who have seen their right to enjoy them restricted,” Senator Mónica Fernández said when the Senate passed the measure.
“In the event that there are no public roads or accesses from the public thoroughfare, the owners of land adjacent to the Federal Maritime Terrestrial Zone must allow free access to it, as well as to the maritime beaches through the accesses agreed upon by the Ministry of the Environment and Natural Resources with the owners, mediating compensation in the terms established by the regulation,” the bill reads, and that, “said accesses will be considered easement.”
The Federal Maritime Terrestrial Zone is the strip of beach spanning 20 meters from high tide which belongs to the Mexican people.
In the past, the government has cautioned hotel owners that their properties could be closed and demolished if they don’t comply with orders to grant access to public beaches.

The director of the federal office of maritime law zones said last December that one hotel project in Cancún, Quintana Roo, was demolished because it would have blocked public access to the beach.
In February of this year, more than 1,000 people gathered outside a beach club in Playa del Carmen to protest the lack of public access to the country’s beaches.
Source: El Universal (sp)
 

Southbeacher

Well Known Member
Does the new law address (or supersede) the law against vehicular traffic (other than for launching) on beaches?
 
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Buffalo Marty

Well Known Member
In the end, this all hinges on the meaning of the word "access". For example, the only way the public can "access" Sandy Beach (to my knowledge, please correct me if I am wrong) is via Playa Hermosa near Calle 13. Is this "access" sufficient, or should anyone have the right to enter Sandy Beach via the condos? (i.e. have the right to park behind the condos and walk through the condo complex to get to the beach)
 
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mexicoruss

Lovin it in RP!
In the end, this all hinges on the meaning of the word "access". For example, the only way the public can "access" Sandy Beach (to my knowledge, please correct me if I am wrong) is via Playa Hermosa near Calle 13. Is this "access" sufficient, or should anyone have the right to access Sandy Beach via the condos? (i.e. have the right to park behind the condos and walk through the condo complex to get to the beach)
Good question....
 

Casablanca

Member
Forum Supporter
Not cool and ILLEGAL! :

AMLO signs off on new law allowing free access to all beaches

Prohibiting access could result in a fine of up to 1 million pesos

Published on Wednesday, October 21, 2020

President López Obrador has signed into law a guarantee of free access and transit on beaches throughout Mexico and establishes sanctions for those who prohibit access with fines of up to 1 million pesos (US $49,400).
The move comes after the Congress approved a reform to the General Law on National Assets in late September that established fines for owners of coastal properties who prevent, restrict, obstruct or place conditions on access to beaches. By law all beaches in Mexico are public.
Fines can be issued if fences, barriers or buildings prevent entry to a beach or if property owners, hotel security staff or other hotel personnel block access when there is not an alternative public path.

Concession or permit holders could see their permissions to operate revoked if they are found in violation of the new law.
“Mexican beaches are constitutionally and legally public, so there must be access roads so that any national or foreign visitor who wishes to enjoy them can do so. However, despite this legal status, there are still multiple complaints from citizens who have seen their right to enjoy them restricted,” Senator Mónica Fernández said when the Senate passed the measure.
“In the event that there are no public roads or accesses from the public thoroughfare, the owners of land adjacent to the Federal Maritime Terrestrial Zone must allow free access to it, as well as to the maritime beaches through the accesses agreed upon by the Ministry of the Environment and Natural Resources with the owners, mediating compensation in the terms established by the regulation,” the bill reads, and that, “said accesses will be considered easement.”
The Federal Maritime Terrestrial Zone is the strip of beach spanning 20 meters from high tide which belongs to the Mexican people.
In the past, the government has cautioned hotel owners that their properties could be closed and demolished if they don’t comply with orders to grant access to public beaches.

The director of the federal office of maritime law zones said last December that one hotel project in Cancún, Quintana Roo, was demolished because it would have blocked public access to the beach.
In February of this year, more than 1,000 people gathered outside a beach club in Playa del Carmen to protest the lack of public access to the country’s beaches.
Source: El Universal (sp)
Common man: +1 (I don't mean to offend anyone but I am just going assume that we fit the first category)

Millionaires and billionaires: -1
 

Idyllwild

Well Known Member
Common man: +1 (I don't mean to offend anyone but I am just going assume that we fit the first category)

Millionaires and billionaires: -1
You’ve volunteered that you are a mid career tech guy looking for a second house near the beach in Puerto Peñasco, so your net worth including 401 Ks and other retirement assets plausibility could be close to a million dollars, and could be double that (or more) by retirement. The houses near the beach in Las Conches that you are interested in buying are mostly $400 K plus (all cash) so you presumably have resources that include $400 K cash for discretionary spending.

I mention this because the us vs. them dichotomy of “common man” vs. “millionaires“ doesn’t cut the same way as it did when Thirston Howell the Third got stranded on Gilligan‘s Island. In fact there are 18.6 million millionaires in the US according to the Global Wealth Report. In many parts of California a million buys a very average house in a marginal neighborhood, and there must be millions of homeowners in California with a million or more in equity.

We hear a lot about “Top 1%” types, but to make top 1% your annual income has to be at least $488,000 a year, which to me at least is still a staggering amount of money. Pull that for 20 or 30 years and you should be able to accumulate $10 M in retirement savings and equity with typically appreciation. Inflation, more rapidly appreciating home prices, and the end of pensions in favor of savings plans have normalized “mere” millionaires.

Millionaires are a dime a dozen in the secondary real estate market. I bet half or more of recent condo purchases on Sandy Beach went to people who could point to a million or more in before and after tax accounts and equity (including their new condo). So, if new beach access rules (right or wrong) disproportionately hurt millionaires, they are hurting the typical owner if not the common man.
 

dirtsurfer

Well Known Member
Forum Supporter
Dirtsurfer, was this at La Pinta estuary? Were you just at the end of the road where they launch the boats, or had you walked closer to the Mayan? Or did you cross the estuary to the mouth?
We were at the Estuary but used the road behind the Mayan so yes, at the end of that road more or less.
 

Stuart

Aye carumba!!!
Staff member
You’ve volunteered that you are a mid career tech guy looking for a second house near the beach in Puerto Peñasco, so your net worth including 401 Ks and other retirement assets plausibility could be close to a million dollars, and could be double that (or more) by retirement. The houses near the beach in Las Conches that you are interested in buying are mostly $400 K plus (all cash) so you presumably have resources that include $400 K cash for discretionary spending.

I mention this because the us vs. them dichotomy of “common man” vs. “millionaires“ doesn’t cut the same way as it did when Thirston Howell the Third got stranded on Gilligan‘s Island. In fact there are 18.6 million millionaires in the US according to the Global Wealth Report. In many parts of California a million buys a very average house in a marginal neighborhood, and there must be millions of homeowners in California with a million or more in equity.

We hear a lot about “Top 1%” types, but to make top 1% your annual income has to be at least $488,000 a year, which to me at least is still a staggering amount of money. Pull that for 20 or 30 years and you should be able to accumulate $10 M in retirement savings and equity with typically appreciation. Inflation, more rapidly appreciating home prices, and the end of pensions in favor of savings plans have normalized “mere” millionaires.

Millionaires are a dime a dozen in the secondary real estate market. I bet half or more of recent condo purchases on Sandy Beach went to people who could point to a million or more in before and after tax accounts and equity (including their new condo). So, if new beach access rules (right or wrong) disproportionately hurt millionaires, they are hurting the typical owner if not the common man.
Spare change, anybody? Been outta work since March due to Covid.

While going through countless interviews (positive), I'm nearly tapped out.

You see a guy with a scraggly beard and a fishing pole on the corner in Penasco, throw me a few pesos.
 

Stuart

Aye carumba!!!
Staff member
Sr. Instructional Designer. I teach people how to do stuff. Two good interviews this week, so I still gotta dog in the fight.
 

Mexico Joe

Cholla Bay 4 Life
Sr. Instructional Designer. I teach people how to do stuff. Two good interviews this week, so I still gotta dog in the fight.
My neighbor upstairs appears to have stopped working back in April. Has a 110k condo, appears to have just given up his car and still no work. Funny because there's literally 50k call center jobs in Phx that could be had daily. I did it for 6 years. You find out a lot about yourself when you're forced to survive. Thank god I've moved on but sometimes I think the right has some argument for the snowflakes. I'm guessing because he's a college grad that call center work is beneath him. I wonder if losing his mortgage might give him that swift kick in the ass that he needs?
 
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