Fishing tackle for kayak fishing Cholla Bay

Idyllwild

Well Known Member
I’m very likely to purchase a Hobie fishing kayak. I was test driving several in Dana Point harbor earlier this week. I grew up fresh water fishing and occasionally did deep sea fishing later, but it’s been decades since I’ve owned any fishing gear. I’d appreciate recommendations for a couple rods and reels and other tackle for Cholla Bay. Also there must be a half dozen must have items that I’m not even thinking off.
 

Mexico Joe

Cholla Bay 4 Life
I’m very likely to purchase a Hobie fishing kayak. I was test driving several in Dana Point harbor earlier this week. I grew up fresh water fishing and occasionally did deep sea fishing later, but it’s been decades since I’ve owned any fishing gear. I’d appreciate recommendations for a couple rods and reels and other tackle for Cholla Bay. Also there must be a half dozen must have items that I’m not even thinking off.
I can think of a few things off hand. I like to have an anchor. You can pick up a kayak specific 2-3lb grappler anchor off of Amazon for $25-30. That will help you stay in one spot if you don't want to drift. I always say spend the money on a good paddle but since you're going with Hobie and I assume pedal drive you may not even need a paddle. Guys I see on YouTube with pedal drive kayaks it's pry a 50/50 split if they even carry a paddle with them. I personally have a fish finder hooked up to my kayak. It's an old Humminbird grey scale unit but it gives you some useful info like what the bottom looks like, density of the bottom IE sand, rock and of course being able to find bait balls and fish. Water temp is also nice to have/know. A lot of these fish finders you can see the thermocline too which is helpful. For ease of use with the anchor I would suggest an anchor trolley. This allows you to clip the anchor to a D ring and then move the anchor to the front of the bow or stern depending on which way you want the boat to face the wind. Generally I only prefer putting the anchor towards the bow. Bow into the wind is a dream. Otherwise, wind to the side of the boat under anchor you can almost drown. I've learned the hard way. Also, anchor line should be 3/1 ratio of water depth. 25ft of water you need or should have 75ft of anchor line to properly scope out the line.

Anchor:

Anchor Trolley

Garmin GPS/Sonar (Same one I have on my Seadoo GTX)

In terms of bait, rigs and lures. Really depends on time of the year and what you're going for. I really don't think you can go wrong at any point in the year with a jig head and soft plastic swim shad.

Fancy SHMANCY jig heads

Poor Mans jig heads

Swim Shad

Keitech Swim Shad (Really popular in NO CAL)

Trolling Lures/Plugs


Deep Divers
 

Mexico Joe

Cholla Bay 4 Life
Reels/Rods

I like Shakespear medium action rods for down there. 4000 spin reel with 20lb braid. You can tie mono or floro leader straight onto the braid with an FG knot. If you're trolling the rocks for something decent in size I'd go with like 15-20lb leader. For trolling you can also tie the braid straight to a snap swivel too. Ocean they aren't as line shy. The monster Orange Mouth Corvina I caught last June was 20lb braid tied straight to the lure. And he walloped it.

My flounder rods/reels are 2000 in size on light medium rods Zebco Rhino Tough with 20lb braid but my leader for flatties is no more than 12lb test mono or floro. I use these for my bass/fresh water rod/reels too.

All of my rods are 6'6". I think it's a perfect size for kayaks.
 
I've fished a ProAngler 12 down in Rocky Point a number of times...just some random thoughts FWIW..

1. AWAYS carry a paddle - you need it to launch, return (when too shallow for the Mirage drive), also my friend lost one of the fins while far from shore, without the paddle he would have been in a bad place.
2. A drift sock can come in handy when there is a touch of wind and you don't want to anchor. An anchor is a mixed blessing, sometimes with a current it may want to pull you under when waves hit you, and drift fishing can be a great way to fish.
3. I had a finder with a gps, which was really nice to know where rocks or other spots were located. ProAnglers had a mounting area on the bottom designed for a transducer, really makes it simple to mount.
4. Hobies are heavy - get the cart with sand tires, you'll be glad when you are rolling it across the beach.
5. I really liked the Yak Attack rails to attach rod holder, fish finder, camera, etc - allows you to move them around while in the water.
6. Tackle web type of net storage is really nice to stuff random things, i had one under the seat and on the side, always had stuff like a rag or such in there.

I sold my Hobie this past year, but it was really a blast to fish - expensive and heavy, but really well designed and had the most comfortable seat of any kayak I've used. Have fun!

T
 

AzDave

Junior Member
Did you buy a Hobie? I almost bought the Pro Angler, and sure glad i didn't. As Fisherman said, its heavy and that unit needs its own trailer, or a long bed adapter. I did buy the Outback and truly love fishing out of it, and it is manageable for a rooftop. If you buy a used one, make sure it has the reverse mirage drive - you will use it. Hobie added that feature on their 2017 and up models.

Solid advice givin so far. In addition to Joe's list, i would add some Kastmasters with the bucktail. Good for jigging and casting.

Haven't fished RP this year yet and miss it! Hopefully soon!

Tight lines boys!
 
Just another thing, I've had regular paddle kayaks, and IMO they can't compete with a peddle drive (and i think some other companies besides Hobie have them now too), I could peddle for an hour straight and not be tired - those peddle drives are so much faster and they free your hands to fish...and if you are like me with bad shoulders, that's a big issue as well.

The weight can really be a factor, if you launch someplace with a gentle slope, it's not too bad, but if there is a hill, you are going to get a workout...I would flag my kids to come down and help me getting it up the hill. :) The plus of the weight is that it does tend to be a bit smoother in the waves and every little gust of wind didn't spin me around as easily.
 

Scrounger

Member
Forum Supporter
I can think of a few things off hand. I like to have an anchor. You can pick up a kayak specific 2-3lb grappler anchor off of Amazon for $25-30. That will help you stay in one spot if you don't want to drift. I always say spend the money on a good paddle but since you're going with Hobie and I assume pedal drive you may not even need a paddle. Guys I see on YouTube with pedal drive kayaks it's pry a 50/50 split if they even carry a paddle with them. I personally have a fish finder hooked up to my kayak. It's an old Humminbird grey scale unit but it gives you some useful info like what the bottom looks like, density of the bottom IE sand, rock and of course being able to find bait balls and fish. Water temp is also nice to have/know. A lot of these fish finders you can see the thermocline too which is helpful. For ease of use with the anchor I would suggest an anchor trolley. This allows you to clip the anchor to a D ring and then move the anchor to the front of the bow or stern depending on which way you want the boat to face the wind. Generally I only prefer putting the anchor towards the bow. Bow into the wind is a dream. Otherwise, wind to the side of the boat under anchor you can almost drown. I've learned the hard way. Also, anchor line should be 3/1 ratio of water depth. 25ft of water you need or should have 75ft of anchor line to properly scope out the line.

Anchor:

Anchor Trolley

Garmin GPS/Sonar (Same one I have on my Seadoo GTX)

In terms of bait, rigs and lures. Really depends on time of the year and what you're going for. I really don't think you can go wrong at any point in the year with a jig head and soft plastic swim shad.

Fancy SHMANCY jig heads

Poor Mans jig heads

Swim Shad

Keitech Swim Shad (Really popular in NO CAL)

Trolling Lures/Plugs


Deep Divers
Thanks for the info MJ I'm in the process of outfitting a heavy duty inflatable (zodiac type) pontoon and am looking at anchors, chairs, etc, etc. I hope to fish with it Down there as well as the lakes. The maiden voyage/test will be soon at Patagonia Lake.
 
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