Huge solar farm in Puerto Libertad going up

Jungle Jim

Well Known Member
#2
After the migrating birds get sliced and diced at the wind "farm" they'll get barbecued on the solar "farm".

Do you have any idea of the coverup the Libbies and EPA are conducting to keep this from the public?

Anywhere with dependable winds up and down the Pacific coast and inland is used by migrating birds that take advantage of the "free ride". Many species including most smaller songbirds make the twice a year trip at low altitudes in order to take advantage of insects, fruit, grains, etc., as they make the journey. They get wiped out by the wind towers, especially on the Pacific Flyway in the San Gorgonio Pass west of Palm Springs where there are a thousand tall towers packed into the narrow pass. When they were first built back in the eighties I would walk under them and see the little carcasses by the hundreds, the Creosote Bush there was coated with feathers. There were plenty of owls and hawks scattered around as well.

I used to offer temporary rest and shelter to hundreds of migrating warblers, sparrows, thrushes and wrens here in my densely wooded property here in Yuma. Now days only very few ever show. I suspect that their numbers have dropped due to the losses at the wind "farms".

Most large birds of prey to include hawks, eagles, owls and of course the Osprey are naturally attracted to tall objects where they watch for prey, roost and nest. There is nothing in their DNA to prepare them for a trio of one hundred foot long propellers moving at speeds of over a hundred miles an hour at the tips.

It's considered "justifiable losses" or "collateral kill" due to lowered use of carbon fuels. Up in the Great Basin deserts of Oregon the wind power companies pay a fine for every eagle killed by the towers, last I heard it was four or five thousand dollars per bird. There is no limit on how many they kill. Think they give a shit about the fine? They just pass it on the their customers.

One afternoon last week I heard the familiar yelp of some type of large sandpiper flying overhead. It was the leader of a group of fifty or sixty of the long billed, long legged Curlews or Whimbrels heading north to their high Arctic summer home. They had most likely spent the winter on the beaches and esteros on the Sonora coast. My first thought was of the gauntlet that lay ahead for them in the San Gorgonio Pass.

JJ
 

jerry

Well Known Member
#3
After the migrating birds get sliced and diced at the wind "farm" they'll get barbecued on the solar "farm".

Do you have any idea of the coverup the Libbies and EPA are conducting to keep this from the public?

Anywhere with dependable winds up and down the Pacific coast and inland is used by migrating birds that take advantage of the "free ride". Many species including most smaller songbirds make the twice a year trip at low altitudes in order to take advantage of insects, fruit, grains, etc., as they make the journey. They get wiped out by the wind towers, especially on the Pacific Flyway in the San Gorgonio Pass west of Palm Springs where there are a thousand tall towers packed into the narrow pass. When they were first built back in the eighties I would walk under them and see the little carcasses by the hundreds, the Creosote Bush there was coated with feathers. There were plenty of owls and hawks scattered around as well.

I used to offer temporary rest and shelter to hundreds of migrating warblers, sparrows, thrushes and wrens here in my densely wooded property here in Yuma. Now days only very few ever show. I suspect that their numbers have dropped due to the losses at the wind "farms".

Most large birds of prey to include hawks, eagles, owls and of course the Osprey are naturally attracted to tall objects where they watch for prey, roost and nest. There is nothing in their DNA to prepare them for a trio of one hundred foot long propellers moving at speeds of over a hundred miles an hour at the tips.

It's considered "justifiable losses" or "collateral kill" due to lowered use of carbon fuels. Up in the Great Basin deserts of Oregon the wind power companies pay a fine for every eagle killed by the towers, last I heard it was four or five thousand dollars per bird. There is no limit on how many they kill. Think they give a shit about the fine? They just pass it on the their customers.

One afternoon last week I heard the familiar yelp of some type of large sandpiper flying overhead. It was the leader of a group of fifty or sixty of the long billed, long legged Curlews or Whimbrels heading north to their high Arctic summer home. They had most likely spent the winter on the beaches and esteros on the Sonora coast. My first thought was of the gauntlet that lay ahead for them in the San Gorgonio Pass.

JJ
I have not noticed any big difference in the bird count at my Fort Bowie ranch in the 14 years I've been out there....the barn swallows should be showing up any day...love them! Got some strange little red birds I have never seen before too. The bird deaths are a real issue but nothing compares to the disaster that is coal fired plants...they now employ 1/5 of the workers ( many sick from exposure to coal) that solar and wind do....here we are...
 
Top