Halibut or Flounder.

#4
Spending my early years fishing the south shore of Long Island New York, the Cortez Halibut reminds me more of what we called Fluke. We fished for those in the summer months by drifting our boat with the current in the bays, inlets, and just offshore the ocean using either squid strips or small fish like killies or spearing along the bottom. Some of the Fluke hook rigs were adorned with white bucktails, but I never found them any more effective in catching fish. They were also known as Summer Flounder to us.

Columbus Day was our unofficial start to the Winter Flounder season. These fish were smaller than Fluke with a different mouth which was much smaller but thicker lipped, and teeth nothing like the Halibut or Fluke. It was more of a mouth that sucked in their food rather than the biting mouth of the Fluke. Fishing for them was by anchoring our boat in known holes in the channels of the inshore bays with longer, smaller "flounder" hook rigs, often adorned by the manufacturer with plastic red beads or yellow plastic corn kernels. The bait used for these fish were either sections of live bloodworms, sandworms, or strips of Little Neck or Cherrystone clams. We would chum first at the hole, using the contents of a can of corn kernels wrapped in a paper bag or newspapers tied to a line that we lowered down slowly and once it hit bottom we would give it a good tug or two to release the corn. This seemed to attract the flounder toward the fishing hole. Although the conditions for fishing these Winter Flounder was usually very cold and miserable, it was rewarding in that they tasted better than Fluke IMO.
 
#6
Cortez Halibut - I had to look that up, and it sure looks like the ones we saw on the beach a week ago. A couple local fishermen were casting a net - and had a nice bucket of fish. Also had some corvina (I think), at least looked like them. Wife ended up buying 2 of the Cortez Halibut and one corvina for $10 USD - seemed fair enough.
 

Kenny

Well Known Member
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#7
Cortez Halibut - I had to look that up, and it sure looks like the ones we saw on the beach a week ago. A couple local fishermen were casting a net - and had a nice bucket of fish. Also had some corvina (I think), at least looked like them. Wife ended up buying 2 of the Cortez Halibut and one corvina for $10 USD - seemed fair enough.
Hi Joe, It seems fair enough.
From the time I first started going down Cholla Bay as a kid in 58, that particular fish in these waters was called a Halibut by everyone I knew. I just hope these Flounder that everyone seems to be catching these days isn't an invasive species.;)
I ran into this on a search. I've never seen anything like it. https://www.seafoodwatch.org/seafood-recommendations/groups/flounder?q=Flounder
 

Kenny

Well Known Member
Forum Supporter
#9
Two different in Rocky Point. Both Halibut by name. The Cortez Halibut and the California Halibut.

https://mexfish.com/fish/fish.htm

I know the California Halibut well, having caught and speared many in my years living in S Cali, but I can't say I've ever caught one in the Sea of Cortez, though I know they're around somewhere. I'd guess they would be more on the peninsula side. Maybe some of the big Halibut that Ric I caught on the 51 was, but I just called them big.

. FLOUNDER~~element3.jpg
 

Mexico Joe

Cholla Bay 4 Life
#10
I read somewhere that the Cortez Halibut only grow to the 5lb range if I remember correctly. I think all the big ones that you guys catch out deep and those in Ric's pics are California Halibut. They are the big guys to my understanding.
 

Kenny

Well Known Member
Forum Supporter
#11
I read somewhere that the Cortez Halibut only grow to the 5lb range if I remember correctly. I think all the big ones that you guys catch out deep and those in Ric's pics are California Halibut. They are the big guys to my understanding.
Ric's an expert on holding fish just right for pictures and having taken that picture, I can honestly say they were big, but not as big as they look in the picture. I know they must overlap, but if you look closely at the ones in the picture, their marking are very similar to the ones we catch on the flats this time of year, but their markings aren't as vivid or bright as the youngsters... "The little known Cortez halibut exists only in the Gulf of California (also known as the Sea of Cortez). Reaching up to 3 feet and 50 pounds, it is the largest flatfish in the Gulf of California and common near shore during cold water months."
 

Stuart

Aye carumba!!!
Staff member
#12
Halibuts are the big boys we catch out at the deep reefs. The smaller ones caught near shore are fluke, or flounder. Both are yummy!

Had an interesting conversation awhile back with someone that insisted all halibut are left-eyed and flounder are right-eyed. Bull pucky! Proceeded to post a picture of my son holding two nice halibut from the 51... one left-eyed and one right-eyed. Identical fish otherwise.

The things people believe. Meh!
 
#13
Ric's an expert on holding fish just right for pictures and having taken that picture, I can honestly say they were big, but not as big as they look in the picture. I know they must overlap, but if you look closely at the ones in the picture, their marking are very similar to the ones we catch on the flats this time of year, but their markings aren't as vivid or bright as the youngsters... "The little known Cortez halibut exists only in the Gulf of California (also known as the Sea of Cortez). Reaching up to 3 feet and 50 pounds, it is the largest flatfish in the Gulf of California and common near shore during cold water months."
I stand corrected sir.
 
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